The Mind-blowing Gap Between Connecticut’s Richest & Poorest School Districts

The Mind-blowing Gap Between Connecticut’s Richest & Poorest School Districts
52 comments, 02/21/2014, by , in LOCAL

Well this is interesting.

We always knew this state was divided up between extremely wealthy and extremely poor towns. But when you take a look at this map of school districts it is even more fascinating.

There are 9 color coded DRG (District Reference Groups) on the map. DRG A is basically all communities with more millionaire family households than non-millionaire. The map goes from there down to DRG I, which is family households whose students are near 100% below the poverty line. The gaps between the groups is crazy. It’s hard to even find a DRG I or H anywhere near a DRG A.

 

tumblr_msrnf203RW1sa56wpo1_1280

 

 

source: qarl-marxx.tumblr.com 

About Begs

is a writer for CTBoom

52 comments

  1. mm
    June 9th, 2014 21:05

    Interesting… DRG A is colored “WHITE” on the map…… Things that make you say hmmmmmmmmmm

    Reply

  2. mm
    June 9th, 2014 21:03

    New Haven at the bottom of the totem pole….. As it surrounds an Ivy League School……. Guess the people that go to Yale live in squalor too?!

    Reply

  3. Goober
    February 28th, 2014 21:08

    It’s interesting to compare income levels to living conditions. In CT, the poor live in decrepit cities. In many many other states, the poor areas aren’t always concentrated in cities. Rural Vermont, for example, is nothing like Bridgeport, or New Haven. Why are the impoverished in CT living is squalor?

    Reply

  4. Michael Leonard Novia
    February 28th, 2014 14:14

    Just go on-line and print the list.  Then check out DRPs.  They’re just as staggering a revelation.  That’s why I’m recommending my book:  God and Education in America: How the Protestant Ethic Reasserts Itself.
    Go to: http://www.educateouramerica.com/.  It’s filled with interesting revelations….It’s a tough read but well worth the time.   Pull the curtain
    aside.   Read.

    Reply

  5. Michael Leonard Novia
    February 28th, 2014 14:10

    Just go on-line and print the list of DRGs.  Then check out DRPs.  That info is just as staggering!  That’s why I’ve recommended my book:  God and Education in America:  How the Protestant Ethic Reasserts Itself.  It’s filled with mind-blowing info!  Go to:  www:educateouramerica.com.   You won’t be disappointed.

    Reply

  6. leannedra
    February 28th, 2014 10:26

    AndrewGarza This is great.

    Reply

  7. One Percent
    February 27th, 2014 8:07

    PatrickMastrobuono

    I’m sorry, could you repeat that?  I was busy waxing my boat.

    Good thing I didn’t live in Bridgeport and didn’t get a good education, or else I wouldn’t be able to even spell boat.  AMIRITE?

    Reply

  8. One Percent
    February 27th, 2014 8:05

    Qarl Marxx

    I concur comrade!

    Reply

  9. February 26th, 2014 22:29

    If you read the original post, you’ll see I stayed that I graduated from a DRG H, and have worked in schools across the spectrum.

    Reply

  10. February 26th, 2014 22:26

    You DEFINITELY missed the point. This is a problem caused by capitalism.

    Reply

  11. Sarah Kate
    February 26th, 2014 21:04

    Honestly, having lived in Connecticut, nothing about this surprises me at all.

    Reply

  12. cnanyc
    February 26th, 2014 16:45

    Yes, great example of what happens when Leftist-elite, anti-school choice, Union supporting Democrats run a State for Decades. Of course, you will never see this story reported by the mainstream media.

    Reply

  13. PatrickMastrobuono
    February 26th, 2014 13:47

    U 12 kid? Why ask a question when we all know the answer

    Reply

  14. PatrickMastrobuono
    February 26th, 2014 13:44

    Oh look another troll psychopathic douchebag trying to irk people. Either that IT actually believes what it just spouted. So the psychopathic douchebag assessment still stands.

    Reply

  15. One Percent
    February 26th, 2014 12:38

    How about instead of complaining about rich people, you learn what made them successful in the first place and try to emulate?
    Nope, let’s take their money and give it to Bridgeport or New Haven and let them waste it.
    YOLO

    Reply

  16. One Percent
    February 26th, 2014 12:33

    U MAD BRO

    Reply

  17. DisguestedbyHumanity
    February 26th, 2014 4:37

    @disgustedbyDBH DisguestedbyHumanityJealous of what? Living in what is currently my hometown? I only rag on Wilton because I live here too and its completely filled with egocentric self entitled narcissists.  Ridgefield, New Canaan and Westport are all just as equally fucked.  There is no longer any heart in these communities, where greed is the only common driving factor for existence.

    Reply

  18. Jack Sparrow
    February 26th, 2014 2:35

    Stamford and Norwalk H??? No way!!! This study is a bullcrap!

    Reply

  19. disgustedbyDBH
    February 26th, 2014 0:48

    DisguestedbyHumanity Ha, you sound jealous. If he killed himself, he wouldn’t be able to pay you when you mow his lawn!

    Reply

  20. disgustedbyDBH
    February 26th, 2014 0:45

    DisguestedbyHumanity   Yo

    Reply

  21. DisguestedbyHumanity
    February 26th, 2014 0:02

    @TCWilton You should go kill yourself for having any essence of pride for living in Wilton or any part of Fairfield county at that.  By bragging about being in the top 1% you completely proved that you have your head buried so far up your own ass that you actually believe your breathing fresh air

    Reply

  22. Michael Leonard Novia
    February 25th, 2014 22:13

    Read:  God and Education in America:  How the Protestant Ethic Reasserts Itself.  DRGs are just a small part of the explanation.  Go to: http://www.educateouramerica.com/.  Read about the true purpose of schools and why they do what they do.  Read about the real America and why she is so powerful and will continue to dominate.  The hidden motivation behind our drive to succeed is the deception and lies we are told, information that is kept from us and literature that we either can’t read or are not supposed to read.  Finally someone tells the truth about America, tells what no one will dare to tell.

    Reply

  23. Gooner88
    February 25th, 2014 22:03

    “It’s hard to even find a DRG I or H anywhere near a DRG A.” Too bad 75% of A’s border an H. Needlessly to say this is a poorly written article.

    Reply

  24. February 25th, 2014 20:28

    Excellent comment by Alex. This map with be lightyears more effective using a diverging color scheme because the data clearly has a meaningful sequence (A, B, C, etc.)  where the two ends of the spectrum are particularly worth highlighting. Cartography 101.

    Reply

  25. AndrewGarza
    February 25th, 2014 19:14

    @Alex  Godhttp://i.imgur.com/UBWHyK7.png?1odd Good idea. Here’s a rough link and attempt.

    Reply

  26. TCWilton
    February 25th, 2014 18:39

    Wilton CT represent

    Reply

  27. LFC2001
    February 25th, 2014 15:06

    Did the author even look at the map, or maybe they’re color blind?? They said “It’s hard to even find a DRG I or a DRG H anywhere near a DRG A”… yet there they are!  Bridgeport, Danbury, Norwalk and Stamford, all right next to that cluster of DRG A’s… kind of hard to NOT find them.

    Reply

  28. Alex
    February 25th, 2014 14:37

    This map would’ve been easier to read and more striking in it’s visual picture if the colors were redesigned along a gradient of the same color. You wouldn’t need to keep checking back with the key to understand it. It doesn’t make sense to compare a purple to a green to an orange.

    Reply

  29. gglidd
    February 25th, 2014 12:33

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/EvalResearch/DRG_2006.pdf  <–this describes how the state dep’t of ed devised DRGs.  They are set up to group districts based on a number of factors, so when a district’s performance needs to be compared to a similar district, they have a ready ‘reference group.’  

    Basically it’s so, Hartford’s scholastic performance is never compared directly to Avon, recognizing the apples to oranges nature of such a comparison.

    Reply

  30. CTlifer
    February 25th, 2014 9:44

    The FCIAC towns (Fairfield County Interscholastic Athletic Conference) is more economically polarized than Saudi Arabia. Fair, that part is indeed mind-blowing. But it’s the closeness of the towns that is mind blowing…not the distance.

    Kids in DRG A and B grow up their entire lives constantly competing in sports against the kids in DRG H and I. In sports like track or swimming (with long meets against the same competitors week after week) or elite travel teams composed of kids from multiple towns (AAU basketball or premier soccer)…it is very common for kids from all different backgrounds to become close friends.

    Reply

  31. February 25th, 2014 8:12

    I was being sardonic when I called it a “FUN GAME!!!” in the original blog post. I think the author who appropriated my blog post for this article missed the point.

    Reply

  32. February 25th, 2014 8:11

    I

    Reply

  33. SR
    February 25th, 2014 7:59

    What is this author talking about, Weston is the only DRG A not directly sharing a border with a DRG H or I

    Reply

  34. ryn519
    February 25th, 2014 0:24

    ChristianYoung  
    When 85 people in the world hold as much wealth as 3.5 billion. Wealth re-distribution or not, to me that number is staggering. It’s easy to say anyone can achieve the 1% with hard work, but it’s not practical and it’s not just motivation holding people back anymore

    Reply

  35. randster
    February 24th, 2014 23:07

    Freddie deBoer EmeraldNocturne randster  As to why the colors are where they are: The southwest corner got its start as being wealthy in part from its proximity to NYC, then higher property values keep those towns unobtainable to lower income families. The northwest and northeast corners are more rural, less proximity to major cities, don’t really attract the big business money but do ‘okay’, and tend to be more agricultural which doesn’t require a degree which lowers the rating . Celebrities may like Litchfield County because it’s scenic but they don’t send their kids to school there so they don’t count for this. Cities in any state tend to be where the rich work but the poor live, the map shows this pretty well. There’s also changes in economy, I know the Naugatuck Valley is a sad sort of story of when a once healthy region loses industry. Same for Torirngton.
    It’s not showing ‘The Mind-blowing Gap’ either. Plenty of orange which is 2nd ‘best’; there is a lot of green and red, which is pretty okay, and purple isn’t too bad either. It actually looks like it’d make a decent bell-curve if graphed as such.

    Reply

  36. randster
    February 24th, 2014 23:07

    EmeraldNocturne randster It’s not “wealth in education” the map isn’t showing district budgets. Its an assessment of student household: incomes, parental education, primary language spoken, and other such factors. The point of the map is so officials can compare performance between districts in the same group: orange to orange, purple to purple. It also protects cities like Waterbury from being compared to cities like Danbury, showing that the comparison isn’t fair to Waterbury. It does NOT show budget or performance of the regions.

    Reply

  37. HerbyHancock
    February 24th, 2014 22:03

    Each town’s taxpayers pay for their education system, it’s not like the state pools all the money together and pushes larger portions of it to Fairfield Co. Most of the state funds that do go toward public school systems go to the urban school systems anyway, because they’re failing and there’s low tax revenue due to high poverty with larger populations. This map really is just showing comparable wealth amongst CT towns – you can relate it to anything (I.e. Funding for roads, youth sports, whatever else tax revenue goes toward).

    Reply

  38. Dan
    February 24th, 2014 21:58

    Under the state’s Minimum Budget Requirement, the city (Bridgeport) should be contributing $58.9 million toward the district’s 2013-14 operating budget but instead the city council passed a budget of $55.6 million toward its school district. The state pays the rest of the $231.7 million. Now it seems, they will be paying even more. http://blog.ctnews.com/education/2013/11/24/city-and-state-strike-a-deal-on-school-funding/
    We are all paying for some school districts.

    Reply

  39. galik
    February 24th, 2014 20:53

    @OpinionatedPrik  There are no hoodlums in Windham CT. Just trees and foxes.

    Reply

  40. ChrisDiCorpo
    February 24th, 2014 18:50

    DanMurphy2  Indeed.

    Reply

  41. DanMurphy2
    February 24th, 2014 18:21

    ChrisDiCorpo    Furthermore, rather than it’s, it should be they’re.

    Reply

  42. ChrisDiCorpo
    February 24th, 2014 17:55

    randster  Or Middlebury which is B next to Waterbury which is I.

    Reply

  43. ChrisDiCorpo
    February 24th, 2014 17:53

    @OpinionatedPrik   It’s***  Their***  Could be***  Not for anything, but I’d like to say you’re not a good example of an educated citizen.

    Reply

  44. February 24th, 2014 17:11

    Its the cities with the hoodlums… if people cared about there education and went to school instead of causing issues the entire state could DRG A (or white)

    Reply

  45. ChristianYoung
    February 24th, 2014 14:16

    Not
    sure what is surprising here … it’s really just a map of the
    whereabouts of what is left of CT’s money. A chart of the towns’ wealth
    and calling the area a “school district” instead of a town. Behind
    the disparity display is an agenda to take money
    from the “wealthier” towns and give to the less wealthy towns under a
    legislated regionalization plan – forcing towns to merge their school
    systems in order to allow less affluent towns access to their neighbors’
    resources. Sounds fair? Another way to phrase the issue is … what
    percent of your income should you be required to give to others who
    don’t make as much? This isn’t a “haves” vs. “have nots” … it’s a
    “have more” vs. “have less.” Wealth redistribution.

    Reply

  46. deinabc123
    February 24th, 2014 13:30

    Worst analysis of a study I’ve seen. Author must be from DRG I

    Reply

  47. GL
    February 24th, 2014 11:47

    This is all about nothing. First of all, there are multiple H and I districts next to A districts.  Secondly, there are a vaxt majority of A-C districts than there are G-I districts — which means that while there are areas that are in great need, overall there’s wealth spread across the state.

    Reply

  48. Freddie deBoer
    February 24th, 2014 11:28

    EmeraldNocturne randster  On the contrary– I think it’s very important to point out this kind of disparity, and I’m glad that this post is up here. My point is not that the discussion isn’t useful. MY point is that in some ways, it’s sadder that the places in poverty are sometimes so close to the places with riches.

    Reply

  49. EmeraldNocturne
    February 24th, 2014 11:26

    randster   Still doesn’t take away from the fact that all of the wealth in education is concentrated in one southwestern portion of the state. Why do people like you like to ignore truthful details to focus on one bad observation?

    Reply

  50. Freddie deBoer
    February 24th, 2014 10:36

    randster  Or West Hartford right next to Hartforad.

    Reply

  51. Pea Tear Griffin
    February 24th, 2014 9:34

    http://youtu.be/-laGL1gz1Y4?t=6m46s

    Reply

  52. randster
    February 23rd, 2014 22:46

    “Its hard to find a DRG I or H around an A” … Stamford, Norwalk, Danbury, and Bridgeport don’t exist then?

    Reply

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